Running Interactively

Routinator can perform RPKI validation as a one-time operation and print a Validated ROA Payload (VRP) list in various formats, or it can return the validity of a specific announcement. These functions are accessible on the command line via the following sub-commands:

vrps:Fetches RPKI data and produces a Validated ROA Payload (VRP) list in the specified format.
validate:Outputs the RPKI validity for a specific announcement by supplying Routinator with an ASN and a prefix.

Printing a List of VRPs

Routinator can produce a Validated ROA Payload (VRP) list in five different formats, which are either printed to standard output or saved to a file:

csv:The list is formatted as lines of comma-separated values of the prefix in slash notation, the maximum prefix length, the autonomous system number, and an abbreviation for the trust anchor the entry is derived from. The latter is the name of the TAL file without the extension .tal. This is the default format used if the --format or -f option is missing.
csvext:This is an extended version of the csv format, which was used by the RIPE NCC RPKI Validator 1.x. Each line contains these comma-separated values: the rsync URI of the ROA the line is taken from (or “N/A” if it isn’t from a ROA), the autonomous system number, the prefix in slash notation, the maximum prefix length, and lastly the not-before and not-after date of the validity of the ROA.
json:The list is placed into a JSON object with a single element roas which contains an array of objects with four elements each: The autonomous system number of the network authorised to originate a prefix in asn, the prefix in slash notation in prefix, the maximum prefix length of the announced route in maxLength, and the trust anchor from which the authorisation was derived in ta. This format is identical to that produced by the RIPE NCC Validator except for different naming of the trust anchor. Routinator uses the name of the TAL file without the extension .tal whereas the RIPE NCC Validator has a dedicated name for each.
openbgpd:Choosing this format causes Routinator to produce a roa-set configuration item for the OpenBGPD configuration.
rpsl:This format produces a list of RPSL objects with the authorisation in the fields route, origin, and source. In addition, the fields descr, mnt-by, created, and last-modified, are present with more or less meaningful values.
summary:This format produces a summary of the content of the RPKI repository. For each trust anchor, it will print the number of verified ROAs and VRPs. Note that this format does not take filters into account. It will always provide numbers for the complete repository.

For example, to get the validated ROA payloads in CSV format, run:

routinator vrps --format csv
ASN,IP Prefix,Max Length,Trust Anchor
AS55803,103.14.64.0/23,23,apnic
AS267868,45.176.192.0/24,24,lacnic
AS41152,82.115.18.0/23,23,ripe
AS28920,185.103.228.0/22,22,ripe
AS11845,209.203.0.0/18,24,afrinic
AS63297,23.179.0.0/24,24,arin
...

To generate a file with with the validated ROA payloads in JSON format, run:

routinator vrps --format json --output authorisedroutes.json

Filtering

In case you are looking for specific information in the output, Routinator allows filtering to see if a prefix or ASN is covered or matched by a VRP. You can do this using the --filter-asn and --filter-prefix flags.

When using --filter-asn, you can use both AS64511 and 64511 as the notation. With --filter-prefix, the result will include VRPs regardless of their ASN and MaxLength. Both filter flags can be combined and used multiple times in a single query and will be treated as a logical “or”.

A validation run will be started before returning the result, making sure you get the latest information. If you would like a result from the current cache, you can use the --noupdate or -n flag.

Here are some examples filtering for an ASN and prefix in CSV and JSON format:

routinator vrps --format csv --filter-asn 196615
ASN,IP Prefix,Max Length,Trust Anchor
AS196615,2001:7fb:fd03::/48,48,ripe
AS196615,93.175.147.0/24,24,ripe
routinator vrps --format json --filter-prefix 93.175.146.0/24
{
  "roas": [
    { "asn": "AS12654", "prefix": "93.175.146.0/24", "maxLength": 24, "ta": "ripe" }
  ]
}

Validity Checker

You can check the RPKI origin validation status of a specific BGP announcement using the validate subcommand and by supplying the ASN and prefix. A validation run will be started before returning the result, making sure you get the latest information. If you would like a result from the current cache, you can use the --noupdate or -n flag.

routinator validate --asn 12654 --prefix 93.175.147.0/24
Invalid

A detailed analysis of the reasoning behind the validation outcome is printed in JSON format. In case of an Invalid state, whether this because the announcement is originated by an unauthorised AS, or if the prefix is more specific than the maximum prefix length allows. Lastly, a complete list of VRPs that caused the result is included.

routinator validate --json --asn 12654 --prefix 93.175.147.0/24
{
  "validated_route": {
   "route": {
     "origin_asn": "AS12654",
     "prefix": "93.175.147.0/24"
   },
   "validity": {
     "state": "Invalid",
     "reason": "as",
     "description": "At least one VRP Covers the Route Prefix, but no VRP ASN matches the route origin ASN",
     "VRPs": {
      "matched": [
      ],
      "unmatched_as": [
        {
         "asn": "AS196615",
         "prefix": "93.175.147.0/24",
         "max_length": "24"
        }

      ],
      "unmatched_length": [
      ]      }
   }
  }
}

If you run the HTTP service in daemon mode, this information is also available at the /validity endpoint.